Author Topic: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger  (Read 23346 times)

chris

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Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« on: June 17, 2015, 10:31:56 PM »
Firstly apologies for this belated thread starting, I started work on this car about a year ago (or more) and kept meaning to post some pics, it was just a few weeks ago when I finally got around to starting to post on ABS and didnít get round to posting here so thought I should play catch up with a few posts.

Apologies now for whats below maybe not completely making sense, its because the only way I will catch up here is to do some copy and paste and therefore it might have bits of comments in reply to other things not written here, a bit of a mess but I thought better than not posting,

Anyway, here goes with copy and paste Ė



Iíve been meaning to start a thread about giving this car a chance of a new life for a long time but once Iíd left it too late it just seemed to become a bigger task to backtrack and I never got to it, lots of other pressures didnít help.

Anyway the car had reached the end of a tough life and was about to be scrapped and the few not broken parts left kept for spares. I liked the car so much that I decided to do something with it.

The idea initially was to just give it a quick & dirty repair, stripping it of everything non essential to leave a lightened car with only the bare essentials.
It didn't quite work out that way and to be honest the project doesn't really have any direction regarding the aim of the result, I'm just doing whatever I feel like at the time, just for fun really.

You might ask why it was almost scrap, well when I bought it in 2010 for £300 unseen it was to run for a while then break, it had a lot wrong with it including a lot of rot and a lot of badly repaired rot.
By the time Iíd done a lot more ropey repairs to keep it on the road for a few more years it was in a pretty shocking state, but I always liked it.

At the point of starting this project it had lots of rot, knackered gearbox, the usual headlining issue, two not working windows, collapsed rear suspension, was barely driveable due to juddering and absolutely countless other things I cant remember broken or faulty. Genuinely what most sane people would call beyond repair.

So why have I finally got around to posting about it, well, I reached a dubious milestone with the project on Sunday (edit, this was a Sunday a few weeks ago) that made me realise the size of the job and that it was about time to post a few pics. I passed the 100 mark in the patch count (yes, Iíve been sad enough to mark every patch in tally charts as Iíve gone). Thatís not counting any panels cut off for access and welded back on, just new pieces I had to make and weld in to make it solid again. Iím hoping that Iíve broken the back of the metalwork now as I think it might be complete at around the 130 patch count mark.
Unfortunately because Iíve left it so long to start a thread Iíve got too many pics to sort through and cant even remember the sequence of events so Iíll be leaving out a lot of the detail to catch up.
Anyway, it got driven into this garage at the end of 2013 I think and nothing much happened until last summer.

Except that we relaid some of the floor behind it and reinstated the extremely handy T shaped pit which had become dangerous.


One of the challenges of the project is the garage, I had no room at home but I rent an allotment with this garage in it, it was a derelict shell when I got it but with a new roof, steel doors, brickwork and recommission of the pit, wiring  etc etc it was ready for its first project car.
The garage location means no mains electricity by the way which has been a huge challenge for a car needing so much welding and considering that I mainly only get to it on a night. More about that later.

The next thing that happened was to remove the engine, which was difficult because whoever last had the engine apart had left off the front engine lifting bracket and it cant be refitted without removing the inlet parts.


The idea of removing the engine was to make it easier to fix some odd bits of rust.
I had no idea just how much rust was waiting but made what might seem like a silly decision to intentionally not look any further than I was working in case what I saw put me off taking the job on. I was right not to look, had I known what I know now it would definitely not have been repaired.
I have stuck to that decision to not look any further than where Iím working and it has never ceased to amaze me.


I will try to add a few pics of the progress as often as I can until I catch up.

Have a little teaser to help you see why Iím surprised the car hadnít collapsed into a mis-shapen heap on the floor.
See through chassis leg.


chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2015, 10:35:09 PM »
A few small jobs that could be progressed while welding was impossible at the allotment.

The car had its carbon canister left in place although not connected for years so that the MOT man couldnít see the bottom of the battery via the inner wing.
I binned the carbon can and drilled off the battery tray.
 

I left it in a bucket of vinegar for a while to get rid of the rust


Then made and attached a new half.



The lambda sensor was the worst seized I have ever seen, and the mounting bracket had snapped off the downpipe,


I work for an automotive manufacturing company, one of the products is exhausts so getting a new sensor boss was no problem. I didnít weld it on, I took it to work so it would be welded with stainless wire and the prototype tech welded it on, as well as repairs to the bracket, he also decided to paint it with the stuff we put on the welds of warranty parts.


The wings were shot, nothing much left for the plastic inners to hang onto and holes at the bottom edges. I bought a pair on ebay from that car that had the back of the roof destroyed.
They were not well packed and one was damaged where it had filler in it, to be fair the seller wouldnít have known about the filler but didnít make a reasonable effort to pack them. He offered a refund if I returned it but it was still much better than what I had so I kept it.  They were described as rust free which wasnít quite true although they were good compared to many.



A small patch on the inside (just tacked here but welded next)

And one at the bottom

Thatís it for now

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2015, 10:39:12 PM »
A few more pics but first a tale of the electricity nightmare that cost a few months of progress last year.

I had to choose whether to transport the car home and work outside when the weather was OK or find a way to weld in the allotment garage, fortunately a friend offered unlimited loan of his diesel generator, with the slight catch that it had never run since he bought it at a bargain price but he knew that the previous owner had been fiddling, just needed a little adjustment apparently.

At this time I managed to get my work to pay for a qualification (NEBOSH) I had kind of pushed them into as part of accepting a job deal, shame it should have happened in winter not spring. Anyway, that was the toughest 7 weeks of education of my life, every waking minute not at work was spent studying so no car progress. I passed by the way so worth it.
After that we went to work on the generator, eventually diagnosed a knackered pump and waited for parts. That fitted it kind of ran, and the welder worked but the generator didnít run right.
One day I fired the heap up and had a think about its unstable speed and its smoke, then it started to rev and rev, I turned off the key which didnít help and eventually it stopped itself.
It had run on its own oil and luckily a pushrod had jumped out and saved complete disaster but when we took it apart the piston was shot. My mate couldnít get a piston (still hasnít) so no welding ability.
I got very frustrated at this point and decided that I would try welding using my own clearly undersized 2.3KVA generator and to my surprise it worked so I got stuck in.
You can guess how the generator story went on but for now I was welding, with much of the summer wasted.
Back to work
The front crossmember was always going to be binned

It came off years ago due to extensive rot in it and the chassis leg  and was attached back on with some crude patches.

The first welds using the generator were a minor repair to the chassis leg

Underneath shows good penetration, all of the welding has good penetration, some of the repairs might be a long way from factory but they are all strong and will last.


Next another easy one to the bumper bracket

A quick fill of the battery tray hole

Then the chassis leg, only working on the passenger side until its done before discovering the horrors of the other side.
The top wasnít great and the overlap with the inner wing was rotted along its length.

I cut out the overlap, now at this point it was still to be a quick but strong repair job so I didnít bother at all with replicating the factory seams, I just wanted the rust gone and a strong repair that wouldnít need doing again.
Throughout the car I keep switching between quick strong repairs not respecting the factory joins and restoration style repairs with the correct overlaps etc, no consistency, just what seems like fun at the time.
When I painted the front end I wished that I had done a better job because it started to look half decent but thatís a lot later.
Repaired like this

Here the inner wing to chassis leg plates are in as is the battery tray area and some repairs in front of the turret.

Then the chassis leg top replaced with bolts welded in for the ABS unit, the inside was painted first and much later waxed.



That was the easy bits in that corner, some of the more painful and unexpected bits next time I have a chance to look for pics.

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2015, 10:44:51 PM »
Iím going to have to speed up the progress in this thread or itíll never catch up with the car, I got another 8 patches welded in tonight (edit Ė a few weeks ago), making the patch count 112.

Iíll try to limit how much detail I post, its not possible to post every repair so just the main steps.

One thing I forgot to mention, at the start of the project I went to BOC and changed my welding gas bottle for a larger size, it was a very good idea for both cost and inconvenience of exchanging it, so far I havenít finished the second one (edit - as Iím posting this now Iím well into a third bottle of Argoshield).
Until a couple of years ago I always used pure CO2 from the fire extinguisher company as it is very cheap but changing to Argoshield light has made welding much more of a pleasure.

Anyway, I had no intention of taking off the triangle panel as I had no reason to expect problems behind there, the rust stains at the bottom tempted me to trim the bottom edge off a bit at a time until the true horror became obvious and I had to remove the panel.








With some of the very rotten bits cut out the turret could be moved with finger pressure, Iíve heard of peoples turrets moving away from the inner wing and its obvious why it could happen with this going on completely unseen, it wouldnít have been long until the handling would have been like driving a jelly.



I lashed in some repairs. I know the bulkhead repair isnít correct but it was bloody difficult to get access so anything strong and watertight would have to do. Those two unsightly welds got left un ground because I would have needed compressed air for the tools I have that could reach in to grind them and I didnít have air in that garage at the time, I regret that because the spoil the finished job.
You can see welds from some older repairs left here too.


In no particular order to save sorting pics, lots of pieces welded in.





A large number of pieces later it was all built up again and primed but I had an idea to slow down the repeat of the rot here, it seems like the scuttle drain feeding everything including salty water into the traps behind the triangle are the main cause so I added a tunnel to take the water directly into the wheelarch area. We shall see how that works.

I added a bit back to the triangle and welded it back on, no pic welded on.


chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2015, 10:50:58 PM »


Moving on, not many pics posted this weekend as I've been working on the body and don't mind admitting that the bits I have been working on have been quite a test of my ability. Its getting there though, patch count now 119 (edit, a lot more now as Iím posting here).
My friends think its quite amusing that I'd done this because it was only the front end needing work, unfortunately I made this judgement without actually looking and using my rather woolly recollection of how rotten it was, and forgot that rust didn't stop when I stopped looking. The back end and everything in between wasn't so good, more later.
If only it was like a Mini or Beetle and just about every panel was available and it was mainly an assembly job, with a rusty Carlton so much has to be made and repaired.

I forgot this bit

Not great but loads better than the other side.

Back to progress in the order it happened.
Around this time inevitably I burnt out the generator, this was a real low point, I had to decide whether to have the car trailered home to weld with mains electricity but have to do it outside and have the nuisance of getting the gear out every time and being restricted by weather.
Instead I had a stroke of luck and found a local generator, I think 3.8KVA, not theoretically big enough but a lot bigger than the one that lasted for quite a while, I got it for only £100 and decided that if I only weld for a time then let it cool it should be OK. So far it has been, fingers crossed.
My electric bill (read petrol) is quite significant with all of this welding.

Anyway, still in the same corner, the chassis leg didnít look great, swelling between spotwelds, so I poked it.
There was get an MOT patch Iíd stuck on years ago

Poke prod etc


Inside

Chop chop




The bottom isnít left in because its made of metal, it isnít, I just left it there temporarily to copy the shape from.

More out, for a distance right down to the bottom there has effectively been no chassis leg inside, outside or bottom, when I got to the floor it turned out to have no real top, so basically no chassis leg due to rot, just rust held in shape by paint.

Small repair to rear
Patch for front

Iíve been very lucky that the strengthener for the steering idler was still solidly mounted, it made it easy to put everything back in the right place.

Thick material, still no problem with weld penetration.

Wherever possible the inside of everything gets painted in zinc rich primer.

Inner repair, I should have removed the fuel pipes I suppose but instead put some temporary covers over.

Bottom in




Outer layer which is actually the overlap of the front leg over the downward section.


Done on all three sides as it should be.



More asap.

bstardchild

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2015, 12:56:52 AM »
Excellent - just what this forum needed - scary pictures of Carlton rust remedial work :D
Cheers

BC

"The Lotus Carlton is not tail happy Ė honestly -† as long as you accept it has 377 bhp and 419 lb/ft of torque, is rear drive and has no driver aids, it's fine."

swordfish

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2015, 06:55:01 AM »
excellent work ,  another one saved  :) :)

PeterC

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2015, 12:12:20 PM »
You must be very fond of it. Well done and I know you will finish it having gone this far. Wonder how many years before my estate reaches that state of need.

Electricity is easy for me. No garage just a fairly quiet road outside my a(n)bode !.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2015, 10:15:14 AM by PeterC »
1993 2.0 CD(X)i Auto Estate (Rioja Red very little tin worm & reasonable paint).
RIP - 1992 2.0 CDXi Manual Estate (Spectral Blue with far too much tin worm, now only parts).

Old age means wondering: Do I really have to struggle to become an expert in something I might never need to do again.

djbthatsme

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2015, 07:50:22 PM »
Well Chris,
By your own admission some of the welding is not the best but your dedication is something to behold. ;D Certainly a tough job well done, I was just wondering what you did in your spare time. :D

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2015, 10:11:11 PM »
Thanks for commenting gents, Iíll just crack on with some more posts so as to catch asap.
TC definitely needed some scary rust pics so that prospective buyers and current owners know what can be hiding and how to fix it.

Donít have nightmares tonight though, yours might not be this bad for a while.

Some more copy and paste -
One comment from me about the work, I donít consider it restoration, to me its repair, quite heavy repair to be fair but to me restoration respects how the factory built it and you will see more and more that I have taken a lot of short cuts, like not having the inner wing overlap with the chassis leg and leaving the detail out of the chassis leg top and leaving welds where they can be seen.
When I work on my red car I think of that as restoration because where I can I like it to be impossible to tell anything has been done.
What Iím doing to this will serve a purpose, be strong and lasting and extend the life of a car that many people might have considered past it. I do make a few of the repairs as original just for the challenge but generally Iím not bothering. note Ė I am highly confident that my work is structurally sound and that Iím competent enough with the welding to do safe structural work.

Not much good stuff tonight, a few more pics of rust and repairs still in the first corner of the car.

A bit of rot and old repair in the footwell directly above the replaced area of chassis leg.

Cut out, so you could say that thatís all four sides of the chassis leg that were rotted. The blue is rust converter, used occasionally if Im not sure I can get it all off bits that arenít practical or necessary to cut out.



View through the hole, white fluff shows how much zinc this paint has in it, same as seen welding galvanised.



A bit of rot where the water likes to sit and rot the wiring.



Chop chop


These two bits repaired Ė I had an idea here, where repairs include the plastic bungs I didnít put the holes back, instead where the repairs cover chassis parts that have been repaired I holesawed new bung holes and used them for access to protect the cavities, more on that later.


I hadnít expected to see one of these rot out, but this one managed.


Here we go with a strong but non authentic repair.







Thatís the main features of the left front corner covered.

I went to the right side next, hopeful that it was a lot better :roll:
It turned out to be different, which is not the same as better.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2015, 10:20:29 PM by chris »

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2015, 10:17:19 PM »
On to the left side corner, Iím keen to catch up a bit so not so many words, Iíll let the pictures do some of the talking.
Good news first, see the damp area around the inner wing to chassis leg overlap, its had a power steering fluid leak since before I bought it and thatís soaked right through the seam to the other side and its rust free. That helped me to make a rust prevention decision, more on that later/
.

The oil hadnít made it to the front unfortunately and it had had a lot of very nasty repairs to keep it on the road, there was no saving the end of this chassis leg.






Chop the leg off doctor!


Ö.and lash up a replacement






The bumper notch and radiator bracket were added later, a pic might turn up further on.



Look at how good the rest of it was when I cleaned it up later for paint.




chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2015, 10:24:08 PM »
More of that corner, then we get close to moving on from the front end.

A bit of ventilation











And lots of patches







I followed factory seams a bit more on this side, kind of unintentionally, its just the way it happened.










BTW, that little bit of rust behind the steering box strengthener got sorted too but I cant find a pic, the leg was generally very good around there and saved a big task if it had been like the other side.[/quote]

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2015, 10:28:03 PM »
I guess I have to agree that its one of the most rotten, but I cant help think that at the age of our cars more of them than we like to think have this kind of thing developing.
Any Carlton with the front legs with patches on the outside only has them due to serious rust bursting its way out from the inside and its just a matter of time before they will need chopping out. Swelling between the spotwelds is a sure sign that the rust is quite serious inside and just hasn't burst through yet.
Similarly any Carlton with wet footwells probably has some issues behind the inner wing guards or the triangle panel, just most people wont know its there.
The cars are getting old now and unless they spent much of their lives as summer cars there could be all kinds of horrors lurking.
I guess LC's will be better on average due to not having spent a lot of years as low cost daily drivers.


Anyway, a few last bits at the front end, nothing special.

Rusty crossmember had fallen off years ago and been patched back on even though it was full of holes




The estate car that myself and Matt Simpson have both owned before which was bent beyond my repair capability when Matt had an accident and kindly let me have it to attempt to repair donated its front crossmember. A couple of small repairs to the ends and a couple of tabs to make it easier to fit were added.




The battery tray was re-attached.



Another small floor repair and chassis outrigger repair. No before pic, it was rusty.







I drilled for one of those floor plugs on top of this later to properly rustproof through.


Thatís the worst of the rot out of the front end, I really wanted paint on before winter, that was challenging.
Being in my allotment garage meant no heat so waiting for the right day with low humidity then working in the warmest part of the day all to reduce the chance of the evaporation of the solvent causing condensation was the only way to do it, I checked the weather and humidity forecast online and took the best day off work.
Unfortunately my compressor is too big to take to the garage so I painted it with a tiny hobby compressor, 25 litre tank thing.
Stonechip on the inderside parts, 1K etch primer, Astro silver basecoat and 2K laquer applied.















A real moment of regret here, the paint went on really well, especially considering painting the inner wings blind leaning in while pointing the gun outwards with the car up on axle stands. Unfortunately because the whole project was always as quick as possible repair and I hadnít expected to be able to paint it well I hadnít done a decent job of the preparation and it shows a lot.
It looks OK in the pics but it is definitely not great in real life. Perfectly adequate for a repaired car that just needs some more life but it could easily have been so much better.
Never mind.

Because of the damp atmosphere I stopped bodywork until spring because there is no point doing work and it starting to rust quickly. I did get the cavity rustproofing done and a few other jobs done over winter, Iíll look for some pics later

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2015, 11:47:54 PM »
A bit more
I cleaned bits and put everything I could back on the front end during winter.
I would have liked it all back together except for the engine but not having done the work on the sills meant that the wings couldn't go on and therefore neither could the rest of the front end.
It was quite a pleasure to clean and refit bits so I bought stainless replacements for the screws, P clips and washers etc. Not a lot of money to make a lot of difference as all of the old ones were badly corroded (as you would expect on this car).

I didn't get carried away with painting everything but one big job was to sort the wiring, it was utterly appalling, the previous owner said that it had been off the road for a very long time with electrical trouble and the garage had left it like corroded tatty spaghetti. I quite enjoyed sorting it out.

I deleted some bits I didn't want like the headlight wash wipe and cruise, and replaced a lot of damaged stuff, some of the harness was binned. I re-wrapped the lot using self amalgamating tape and the proper flexible covers that I recovered from the spares estate car, it looks a lot better.












I enjoyed the tidying and finding the proper clips and fastenings so much I heated up the slam panel sticker from the estate and removed it to put on here for the original look. Pointless on this car but satisfying.

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2015, 11:53:22 PM »
I had a go at rebuilding the brake calipers because they looked shocking, it turned out that there was nothing functionally wrong with them.

Starting at the front, all of the castings looked a bit like this


I decided to try electrolytic rust removal, submerging in electrolyte (washing soda and water) and passing a small current through to de-oxidise the rust. It worked well.



They came out of the bucket and the rust was a black substance that rinsed off.



Leaving this



I set up my small parts paint booth, sheets hung in the garage and a big radiant heater on to get the temperature high. I first did this when I spent a while restoring / modifying 70s bicycles and its quite handy.



Then rebuilt them with new seals and bleed nipples etc and red stuff pads.




And refitted them with some discs that I skimmed years ago, they were drilled and grooved EBC discs that rusted badly over a winter and after skimming them I wiped them over with thinned primer to keep the rust off. Skimming on a lathe isnít easy, to achieve parallelism and this was my first attempt, I think it went well so Iíll try them and if no good replace them.




chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2015, 12:02:00 AM »
Here goes with a rapid smattering of various  jobs  that got done during winter.

A couple of pics to finish off the brakes.

The handbrake internals were replaced, shoes and holddown kit. In future it may need back plates but Iíll deal with that later.
I fitted a new handbrake cable, that was a particularly difficult job, I donít know if I did it wrong but it seemed like a lot of hard work.

Most of the brake pipes were very good, but the invisible bits above the rear axle area  were terrible, the visible pipes seemed to be the only part of the car well protected from rust.

Iím sure a few of us have struggled with this Tee piece that is so difficult to reach Ė



I moved it to here to make life easier



The rear discs were quite good so got derusted and the edges painted to slow the rust.
The rear calipers turned into a nightmare. I decided that life was too short to go for the same standard as the fronts on this car  but wanted to make them safe and sound.
Out of four calipers I had (two from a car I broke years ago) I struggled to make two calipers. Two castings broke where the screwdriver is pointed here, it just fell off and the break showed it had been waiting to do that for a while


All of the bleed nipples were rotted so badly that they broke straight off, because I had no good one I foolishly made the assumption that they were the same thread as the fronts and also assumed that they were fitted perpendicular to the surface, anyway I snapped an extractor off in one before remembering that they are just rubbish and I know how to drill broken things right out, ruined two working out that I had got the thread size and angle wrong and successfully drilled only one out. Very embarrassing, Iím supposed to be good at stuff like that.
Anyway, you can see that one caliper has the bleed nipple on the wrong side, it just means that to bleed it will need the wheel off. Its there because I drilled an opposite side casting with a brand new hole for the nipple. It worked well.  Both calipers were made from the few saveable castings I had.
Fortunately the pistons and seals were very good so were cleaned and re-assembled.

 



Not looking great but all safe and working.

I swapped one drive shaft due to a split boot, and while it was out changed its seal in the diff. Itís a quiet diff so worth keeping the oil on the inside.


The front bottom suspension arms were replaced with little used ones, I painted them in 2k paint to help them last while the painting gear was out and pressed in genuine vertical bushes.


I fitted new drop links, a while ago I experimented with cheap droplinks and found that filling them with grease prevented the ball from rusting and chomping away at the insides.
This time I bought Delphi items, not genuine but a reputable brand and still cheap. I popped the seals off to find just a light film of lube


I filled them with grease, its supposedly rubber friendly grease so the boots should be fine.



One thing that got done soon after painting was Waxoyl, with a bit of a difference.
The observation of how the right hand chassis leg had been saved by an oil leak and other experiences over the years I decided that oil would be a good thing in cavities but on its own would run off too soon and need too frequent re coating.
I decided to mix new engine oil (I had a 20l barrel of diesel oil from years ago) 50/50 with waxoyl and fill everything with a lot of it including all of the underbonnet  areas so it could seep into the seams.
I used an un-needed continental quilt under it to catch the run off and put a lot everywhere done so far with a powerful spray.

It might not be wise to do it beside a cup of tea in future.
Here is the mixing machine.

A few months on and the wax is helping to keep the film thick while the coating is very soft and oily so it should seep into joints, a couple of hours a year might keep the insides of everything soaked if the car lasts, and it wont cost too much.
Its completely useless for the exposed underside areas of course, the inner wings etc got shutz applied.

Another thing I did was to modify a trolley to be an engine stand that can take the engine or engine and gearbox while anything can be removed.
I then got help and took it home on a trailer so that I could work on it over winter. I didnít get far.
 

Thatís all for now, back to bodywork next, the thread will soon catch up with the progress.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2015, 12:04:52 AM by chris »

PeterC

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2015, 12:13:47 PM »
There has been a thread on here before about rust prevention. I must find it - full of similar/alternative ideas iirc. My blue Carlton estate might not have been as bad as your task BUt your photos certainly give me flashbacks to when I stripped the blue estate around February 2013  :o.

Keep up the good work, I admire you for it.
1993 2.0 CD(X)i Auto Estate (Rioja Red very little tin worm & reasonable paint).
RIP - 1992 2.0 CDXi Manual Estate (Spectral Blue with far too much tin worm, now only parts).

Old age means wondering: Do I really have to struggle to become an expert in something I might never need to do again.

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2015, 11:59:59 PM »
Thanks Peter.

Back to some metalwork.

Annoyingly Iíve lost some of the pics of this next bit.
A little bit of rot started from what looks like damage from a jack on the bottom of the channel shape, close to the usual rot on the seam at the back corner of the floor.
 


Try to ignore the sill for now.

Pics of the repair are missing, and it was a bit of a pain to make that channel shape, a couple of pics in primer.




Next, under the seat.
Tip Ė If the black tar board under your seat has swellings in it either leave it alone or prepare to find that the rear chassis leg is immediately under there and the rot in the leg has taken the floor with it.
I should have taken a pic of the swelling but thought nothing of it. Anyhow, under it was this



So I unbolted the seat belt and things got worse





Chop chop


Surprisingly the chassis leg repairs I did years ago were holding up well, yes, they are rusty but not much needing immediate attention (one small repair) so my though it to leave them alone until such a time as there is work needing the rear subframe taking off.

Big repair piece, awkward shape


Welded in, difficult to get a pic due to lots of reflection.





On to the boot next, where I feel silly for stating to my friends early on that there was nothing to do at the back end, must have had a mental block :oops:

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #18 on: June 21, 2015, 12:04:29 AM »
Some more rust Ė
While working on the brakes I noticed a coin size piece of loose underseal on what I thought was a solid spare wheel well in a solid back end. HA HA HA HAAA, what kind of loss of sanity gave me the idea that the car would have a solid area!

Anyway, a quick poke showed a bit of corrosion.



So I went up top and looked around at the ahem solid areas around the solid wheel well.


Not easy to see but there was rust all over including the rear quarter
This bit was dust so I chopped it off and made a new bit, I didnít bother with the swage lines.


The only way forward was to chop it all out



Quarter patch in


You probably cant tell but I massaged the front of this area (back of rear wheel well) quite a bit forward, I thought Iíd take the opportunity to fit a much larger wheel well in case of future bigger wheel choices.


I made a well that is as deep as the bottom of the back bumper and as wide as I could fit, you can throw the standard spare in from a distance and have room to spare now.








Notice the lack of exhaust hanger, the first pic was misleading, it had rotted off in about 2010 and was bodged back on by putting some long bolts and spacers straight through the boot floor, Iíve made a new one to bolt in place to be fitted later.

Thatís it for now.

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2015, 12:11:48 AM »

I should mention that my finishing target mentioned way back of 130 patches / repair panels is out of the window, it stands at exactly 130 now, its sure to pass 150 (edit added, it has gone well past 150).
A little more rust repair on the solid back end next.
This three layer bit under the light was rotted through




Outer patch on. Not what you would call smooth for an outer panel but at this time Iíd set myself difficult weekly targets and a few times took more short cuts that normal, Iím constantly finding it hard to be happy with the balance of making an untidy car solid quickly for fun and doing a better job.
Iíve got a tidy GSi, theres just no need to do restoration on this one, just sound repair.

Boot corner

outside
chop chop


Notice the chewed up wires, a small grinder accident. Later soldered repairs and covered with heatshrink.

I should have chopped that bottom bit right off but just crudely put half of it in and didnít bother with swage lines.

Patched

I reached 100 patches in this pic, its written on.


A regrettable shortcut, that long repair should have been two panels with a downward seam but I just went straight across for quickness. Completely safe and sound but not as original.


How can even the towbar be rotted right through?


More another day, this thread is getting close to being caught up with where I am up to now.

swordfish

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2015, 06:31:35 AM »
have you been using a plasma cutter to remove the rotten areas 

bstardchild

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #21 on: June 21, 2015, 09:09:17 AM »
have you been using a plasma cutter to remove the rotten areas 

Slitting discs on an angle grinder I think
Cheers

BC

"The Lotus Carlton is not tail happy Ė honestly -† as long as you accept it has 377 bhp and 419 lb/ft of torque, is rear drive and has no driver aids, it's fine."

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #22 on: June 21, 2015, 10:31:47 PM »
have you been using a plasma cutter to remove the rotten areas 

Slitting discs on an angle grinder I think

Spot on, and a hacksaw blade and file.
A plasma cutter is not at the top of the shopping list yet. A decent weld set is at the top, well, after building a large garage at home.

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #23 on: June 21, 2015, 11:16:24 PM »

Someone over on ABS asked about how Iím shaping the metal so I took a couple of pics of making one part, I donít have a lot of sheet metal tools and even less at my allotment where Iím doing the work.

The main tools



A big vice, various bits of sturdy angle iron and flat bar with various radii ground on as required, an offcut of colliery railway line and a little hammer.
Sometimes I use a bigger hammer but for most work a little one does a much better job.
Other than these, some bits of wood and anything that's around and has the shapes I need.

For anything really difficult there is a guillotine and folder at work but its very rare I can wait to go to work and back, usually if I've cut out I need it made there and then.

A couple of pics of a part I made today to give you the idea.





The rest was bashed to shape on the vice with the hammer, a couple of notches cut for the angle.




I carelessly left a tab off so welded one on and drilled some plug weld holes.



And welded it on



Thatís out of sequence with the thread so the next pics will be back to the timeline as it happened.

chris

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Re: Carlton GSi 24v G624XME Scrapyard Dodger
« Reply #24 on: June 21, 2015, 11:23:19 PM »
Next bit, when I went to the boot to have a look at the hole in the spare wheel well I was taken by surprise when leaned on the boot lip and it fell away, Iíd completely forgotten that it was rotten years ago and Iíd just avoided touching it to help keep it looking boot shaped until the end of its life and that final journey to the showroom in the sky.





I have to admit I found this repair quite a challenge, I would have liked a cut from another car to weld in but Iím far too impatient to try to find that, so had a go.

There was only one spot on the whole of the lip that was intact and not either missing or burst open, about 10mm long held by a spotweld so at exactly that spot I made a couple of profile gauges to work to before it was cut off.


From the gauge I made up some lengths of the profiles for the top and underside of the lip.




The plan was to cut some chunks out, then weld in sections, then cut out the bits previously left behind and weld in more sections until it was all new. It took quite a while.

The particular difficulty here was that the lip is curved around the back of the car.

Some pics to do the talking.





 

This end was needing more than just a lip and it should have had some unusual shapes, I made a bit of an effort with it for the challenge.


The outside was easy enough


The inside needed a bit this shape, or alternatively a quick plate, who would know, but it seemed a good idea to make an effort

I guessed a blank shape to start with.

And bashed it round a bit with the little hammer


And welded it in

Some tapping and smoothing later








That was that, I found it quite difficult but was quite happy in the end. I hope I straightened it a bit more after this, if not I will do, in the pics it looks a bit wonky, easy fix though.

Things you would never imagine could rot have done on this car, even the steel core in the boot lip seal, even a rubber seal is scrap due to rust, I need to have a search to see if I kept the one from the car I broke years ago, not the kind of thing I expected to need.

Thats the boot area about done so off to a sill next, which I thought would be easy :roll: